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Best Clack Egg Opener

Eggs are almost the perfect food, especially when soft-boiled – it’s like eating warm liquid gold nestled in a pillow of white. But getting into that tasty center without bits of shell falling into the mix can be tricky. It takes patience and skill, unless you use a clack egg opener.

If you have never heard of, or seen a clack egg opener, once you do, you’ll wonder how you ever un-topped a soft-boiled egg without one. This ingenious little gadget works with gravity or a spring mechanism to remove the top of an egg easily, with no shell residue.

The various models of clack egg openers work in slightly different ways. The majority have no sharp edges and are so simple to use, a child can do it. If you’ve been craving soft-boiled eggs but hate peeling the top off with a knife, then an egg clacker may be just the ticket to get you back to your favorite breakfast food.

We feature five clack egg openers you can purchase online. Read on to find the one that suits you best.

Top Pick Best Ease-of-Use: The Original Clack Egg Opener 

If you’re the kind of person who appreciates precision design and excellence in performance and doesn’t mind paying for it, then consider this clack egg opener from Take 2.

While it is more expensive than other models, it is a top-quality product that combines German engineering with stylish stainless steel durability, using gravity to precisely open the top of eggs consistently every time.

This egg opener so easy to use, you can have your children do it. You place an egg into an egg holder then put the dome of the stainless steel clacker over the egg. Lift the ball to the top of the stainless steel rod and let it drop.

Once that is done, remove the egg clacker and gently lift off the top of the opened eggshell using your finger or a knife. This gadget will crack the top of the egg without making a mess.

Very versatile, this model can be used with any sized egg and is designed for small, medium and large chicken eggs, as well as duck and goose eggs. The egg can be raw, soft or hard-boiled – this clack opener will still take the top off with ease.

With no sharp edges, the egg opener uses a combination of gravity and the weight of the stainless steel ball to pierce eggs, making it completely safe and easy to use. Cleanup is a breeze too thanks to the dishwasher safe design and the best part is, you never have to worry about eggshells finding their way into your food again.

Pros:

  • Made from durable stainless steel
  • Uses gravity to open the top of an egg
  • No sharp edges

Cons:

  • More expensive than other models

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Top Pick Best All Around: Rösle Stainless Steel Egg Topper with Silicone Handle

This clack egg opener is an all ‘round good choice for any household that consumes a lot of eggs. Made of 18/10 stainless steel with a silicone handle on top, it uses a spring action handle to gently crack the top off an egg.

The process is similar as with other models except with this item, you hold the egg in one hand while you place the dome of the opener on top of the egg. Lift the handle, let it drop once, and then repeat.

A spring mechanism causes a vibration and the sharp edge in the dome makes a perfect cut on the shell. Remove the opener and then with your finger or a knife, gently take off the top of the egg.

You can use this clack egg opener on soft and hard-boiled eggs with the confidence that it will do so easily and cleanly, leaving no eggshells behind. Not recommended for raw eggs.

Pros:

  • Compact in size
  • Works on soft and hard-boiled eggs
  • Made from 18/10 stainless steel

Cons:

  • Holding egg in hand and using the opener may be awkward for some people
  • More expensive than other models

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Top Pick Best Set: Epare Easy Eggs Opener

Eating soft-boiled eggs takes more than heating eggs in hot water and randomly cracking them open. Once they are done the way you like them, you need to remove the top, put them into a holder and spoon out the deliciousness inside.

We included this practical yet attractive set because includes everything you need to prepare and enjoy your eggs easily, with no annoying bits of shell to ruin the experience.

The egg cutter is equipped with a finely calibrated vibration-activated shell remover that is so easy to use. Put the egg into the holder, place the clack egg opener on top of the egg and gently pull up on the plastic ball grip. Release and it will cleanly score the top of the eggshell.

Along with the egg opener, this set comes with two elegant-looking stainless steel eggcups and two stainless steel spoons. And when you’re not using them to eat eggs, the cups and spoons can be used for other foods such as dips, sauces and dessert.

This set would make a really nice gift to yourself, or for the egg-loving foodie in your life.

Pros:

  • Set includes a 5.5-inch stainless steel egg topper, 2 stainless steel eggcups and 2 stainless steel spoons
  • Makes a nice gift
  • Easy to use egg opener

Cons:

  • More expensive than just purchasing a clack egg opener
  • Opener has a sharp, vibrating blade

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Top Pick Best Versatile: ICO Egg Topper and Cracker 

This versatile stainless steel clack egg opener is great for anyone who likes to indulge in more than hen eggs. It is suitable for small, medium and large sized hen eggs, and can also be used on duck and pheasant eggs.

It’s easy to use, too. Place the stainless steel topper onto a boiled egg, pull the spring-loaded ball on top and let it ‘clack’ down on the shell. A mini shockwave travels down the steel rod and neatly cracks the top off your egg with perfectly clean edges and no broken shell pieces in your egg. Carefully pull up and the eggshell will come off with the topper, or you can use your fingers or a knife to lift it off.

Cleaning the clack egg opener is easy as it is dishwasher safe, or you can wash it by hand.

Pros:

  • Easy to use
  • Can be used different types of eggs
  • No blades

Cons:

  • Requires more than one crack to get the job done

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Top Pick Best Basic: Ashero Stainless Steel Egg Opener

If you have never used a clack egg opener and want to try it without spending too much money, then this budget-minded model may be for you.

With its unique design, this egg topper is smaller than other models and fits into your hand. The cap or dome of the cutter is slightly larger than the size of the average teaspoon, so the hole will be a good size to dip in and enjoy the inside of the egg.

Unlike other models that use gravity or a spring-activated vibration to make the cut, this one has a weight. To use, place the egg in an eggcup, with the narrow end of the egg upwards. Place the egg topper on top of the egg. Pull the top part and release it and let it rebound to the topper.

Remove the egg cutter and the result is a perfect circle cracked into the shell that can be easily removed with your hand, a spoon or a knife.

The stainless steel topper is durable, can be used on raw or soft and hard-boiled eggs that are small, medium or large. It is dishwasher safe, so clean up is fast and easy.

Pros:

  • Very affordable
  • No sharp edges
  • Can be used without an eggcup

Cons:

  • The hole it makes may be too small to fit some teaspoons

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Things to look out for:

Consider these things when looking for a clack egg opener so you will choose one that best suits your needs:

Mechanism: The function of a clack egg opener is to make a perfect crack on the top of an egg so you can pull it off in one, solid piece, with no tiny bits of shell getting inside the egg. It is also a great tool for children to take the top off a soft-boiled egg without them getting frustrated, making a mess or creating little bits of shell. All egg openers can do this job, some more successfully than others, because they use different mechanisms to do the cut.

The original clack egg opener and some other models use gravity, which means a ball or weight drops onto the dome covering the top of the egg, and the action creates the crack that then is lifted off with a finger or a knife.

Another method uses a spring action vibration to do the job. This usually entails lifting a handle and then releasing it back onto the top of the egg. There are clack egg openers that have a round hole that is attached to scissor-like handles that you squeeze to remove the top of the egg. This type of egg topper doesn’t work as well as other models, since the shell of some eggs can be smooth and slippery.

Some egg toppers have a sharp edge inside the dome to help the process, but it is not necessary to have that feature for it to work well. One other thing to look out for is to make sure the size of the dome that covers the top of the egg will make a hole large enough to fit your spoon in so you have no trouble scooping up all that eggy goodness.

Ease of use: Once you have decided on which mechanism works best for you, consider how easy the egg opener is to use. A model that you can use while the egg sits in an egg cup means your hands are free to release the mechanism that does the cutting. If you choose a model where you have to hold the egg in one hand and use the clack egg opener with the other hand, it may be awkward to handle.

Versatility: Most egg clack openers work well on hen’s eggs that are small, medium and large. Some also work with duck, goose and pheasant eggs, but not quail eggs. Consider the size and type of eggs you eat before choosing a topper, especially if you regularly eat jumbo size or goose eggs, which are larger than typical hen’s eggs.

As well, some clack egg toppers only work well with soft-boiled eggs, while others are more versatile and can be used on raw and hard-boiled as well.

Price: Like most items, clack egg openers come in a range of prices, but overall even the most expensive model is affordable for most budgets. Nonetheless, you should never spend more than you can afford. Plus, if you just want to try out a clack egg opener without putting out too much money, there are many budget-minded options out there.

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